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Meet the Assistant Professor candidates the week of Nov. 14

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The Department of Anthropology invites the UTM community to meet Dr. Mark Grabowski, Dr. Lauren Schroeder, and  Dr. David Samson from Nov. 14, 16 & 23, 2016. Not only will the each candidates be giving a mock lecture on evolutionary anthropology, with relevant specialties such as paleoanthropology, primatology with an evolutionary focus, human physiology and adaptation, and related topics, including behavioural aspects of human evolution. The mock course lecture will be followed by job talks as well as lunches at UTM. The event is welcome to all, especially Anthropology undergraduates, graduates, and faculty members!

Check out the first lecture by Dr. Grabowski:

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The following candidates will be visiting for an Assistant Professor position; as described in the job ad, the candidate must have an established research program focused on evolutionary anthropology, with relevant specialties such as paleoanthropology, primatology with an evolutionary focus, human physiology and adaptation, and related topics, including behavioural aspects of human evolution. All of the candidates were outstanding applicants in and exceptional pool.

All of the job talks and mock course lectures are open to all, as are the lunches at UTM and the meet-and-greets at St.George. (Mock course lectures are intended to be a presentation for an upper level undergraduate theory course focused on theory related to the candidate’s own research topics.) Both talks and mock lectures will be at UTM, and will be posted on a password-protected site, links to be provided in future.

Committee members in the Anthropology department are: Heather Miller (UTM and Committee Chair); Esteban Parra, Tracy Rogers, Sarah Hillewaert, Ted Banning (Graduate Chair), and Elizabeth Sawchuk (AGSU rep) Anthropology Graduate Student Union representative
(1) Mark Grabowski (please see attached CV: utmbiolanth-grabowski-cv-to-circulate)

Dr. Grabowski integrates paleoanthropology with evolutionary biology through quantitative genetics, evolutionary modeling, and phylogenetic comparative methods to focus on the evolutionary basis of human physical adaptations, concentrating to date on the pelvis, brain and overall body size, including a 2016 sole-authored article in Current Anthropology. He is seen as both an outstanding evolutionary quantitative geneticist and a natural historian and comparative biologist, bridging traditionally divided types of analysis, producing work that combines foundational evolutionary theory with large data sets and state-of-the-art statistics, and as someone who challenges conventional wisdom. His work has examined the relationship between bipedalism and obstetrics in relation to the differences seen in hominin pelvic morphology, focusing on the effects of underlying genetic relationships among traits with results affecting major research pathways in this topic. He has also published high-profile articles on the evolutionary implications of the genetic correlations between brain size and body size in the hominin lineage, a coupling that significantly affects reconstructions of human evolution.

Nov. 14 at UTM
10-11 am: Mock Course Lecture in HSC332
12:10 – 1:30 pm: Open Lunch in HSC Fourth Floor lounge
2 – 4 pm: Job Talk in DV3129: The evolution of human brains and bodies

Nov. 15 at St. George
12 – 1:30 pm: Lunch Meet-and-greet with faculty and graduate student in AP248
(Faculty Lounge; may be available for meetings until 3 pm, to be determined)
(2) Lauren Schroeder (please see attached CV:utmbiolanth-schroeder-cv-to-circulate)

Dr. Schroeder uses sophisticated quantitative methods applying quantitative genetics and 3-D scan data of hominins to investigate morphological variation in hominins, especially the transition from australopith to Homo lineages in the Pleistocene. She has been and continues to be involved in the discovery, description and analysis of the exciting recent discoveries of new Homo fossil material in both the Malapa and Rising Star projects, and was selected as part of the Rising Star Workshop to take the lead for the cranial and mandibular (skull) remains of Homo naledi for the first publications in Science. She is also part of a collaborative project with both Cape Town and Buffalo, among others, on the morphological signatures of hybridization in primates and other mammals, a project with significant potential for the recognition of hybridization in hominin lineages. She is seen as a talented evolutionary morphologist and paleoanthropologist, combining independent thinking and intellectual agility, with outstanding quantitative skills and strong theoretical underpinning.

Nov. 16 at UTM
10 am – 12 noon: Job Talk in DV3129: Microevolutionary approaches to the study
of human morphological evolution
12:10 – 1:30 pm: Open Lunch in HSC Fourth Floor lounge
2 – 3 pm: Mock Course Lecture in HSC332

Nov. 17 at St. George
10:30 – 12:30 pm: Brunch Meet-and-greet with faculty and graduate student in AP248
(Faculty Lounge; may be available for meetings until 3 pm, to be determined)
(3) David Samson (please see attached CV: utmbiolanth-samson-cv-to-circulate)

Dr. Samson’s research directly addresses the central anthropological question of human uniqueness in comparison to other animals for the major topic of sleep. He investigates the link between sleep and human evolution in revolutionary and novel research recording sleep data sets and sleep architecture for a range of primates including lemurs, zoo orangutans, wild chimpanzees, and humans living in different types and scales of societies (including a recent National Geographic grant to study sleep in Hadza hunter-gatherer communities). Sleep has been identified as a major factor in many aspects of human physical and mental health, yet almost no research has been done on the role of sleep in human evolution. Dr. Samson is seen as an exceptional and energetic interdisciplinary scholar using broad, sophisticated research strategies to investigate major behavioural and physiological transitions in human evolution, with results that have significant implications for modern human medical, occupational and life-style issues.

Nov. 23 at UTM
10 am – 12 noon: Job Talk in DV3129: Sleep and Human Evolution
12:10 – 1:30 pm: Open Lunch in HSC Fourth Floor lounge
2 – 3 pm: Mock Course Lecture in HSC332

Nov. 24 at St. George
10:10 – 12 pm: Brunch Meet-and-greet with faculty and graduate student in AP248
(Faculty Lounge; will need to leave for the airport no later than 12:30 pm)

 

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